Understanding Wrinkles

 Understanding Wrinkles

(Image: iStock)

Worry lines, frown lines, smile lines, crow’s feet – you've likely heard a number of nicknames for wrinkles. And while we might call them laugh lines, odds are if you have them, you don’t find them particularly funny.

Despite the many euphemisms we have for wrinkles, they all refer to the same problem – tired-looking, aging skin. But not all wrinkles are the same. In fact, there are actually many types of wrinkles. And they are created differently and require different treatments.

Types Of Wrinkles

There are many types of wrinkles, 5 of which were identified by an article on the New Beauty website. But for the sake of simplicity, I’ll be discussing 2 broad categories of wrinkles under which most other wrinkle types can be classified: dynamic and static. Let's explore each of these further to better understand how they happen and what you can do about it.

Dynamic Wrinkles

  • What they are: Wrinkles that appear when we make facial expressions.
  • What causes them: Smiling, squinting, and frowning all create creases that gradually etch unwanted lines into our skin over time. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to avoid dynamic wrinkles (unless you’re a vampire, or Gwen Stefani).
  • Where they occur: Dynamic wrinkles are often seen around the eyes and mouth. They are also commonly located between the eyebrows and on the forehead.
  • Also known as: Smoker’s lines, crow’s feet, bunny lines, frown lines.

Static Wrinkles

  • What they are: Static wrinkles are those that persist even when we aren't making facial expressions. They are often deeper and more pronounced than dynamic wrinkles.
  • What causes them: Unlike dynamic wrinkles, static wrinkles don't go away when we stop smiling or squinting. They can evolve from dynamic wrinkles but are usually the result of lost collagen, fat, and elastin – three components to youthful-looking skin. The normal aging process, gravity, genetics, and certain lifestyle choices (such as smoking) can all impact the rate at which static wrinkles form.
  • Where they occur: Static wrinkles typically occur in the nasolabial fold – a line that extends from the base of the nose to the corners of the mouth (hint: they look like parentheses). They can also include other deep facial creases or folds.
  • Also known as: Laugh lines, smile lines.

What You Can Do

A good skincare regimen is essential. Using products that contain a chemical exfoliator such as Retin-A can soften fine lines and also boost collagen production. Emollient-rich moisturizers can also plump up superficial creases. But for more dramatic results, you may need to consider minimally invasive treatments, such as BOTOX® Cosmetic or dermal fillers.

  • BOTOX CosmeticAccording to Allura Skin & Laser Center, a dermatology practice offering BOTOX in Burlingame, California, BOTOX is ideal for treating and even preventing dynamic wrinkles. It is often beneficial for those looking to reduce the look of lines around the eyes, lips and forehead. BOTOX works by preventing the muscle contractions that cause facial movements, thereby inhibiting the formation of lines and creases. This both softens your current wrinkles and can even slow the development of future wrinkles with long-term use.
  • Dermal fillers: Dermal fillers behave differently than BOTOX and are better suited for static wrinkles. Rather than preventing facial muscle movements, dermal fillers contain a naturally-occurring substance called hyaluronic acid that adds volume to deep wrinkles and depressed areas of the face. Hyaluronic acid occurs naturally in the body and should post no health risks. Dermal fillers are ideal for reducing the look of deep facial folds, but can also be used to enhance the lips or sculpt more youthful facial contours.

Combining BOTOX and dermal fillers often yields the best results. In doing so, you address multiple concerns simultaneously and maximize your wrinkle-fighting abilities by both preventing (BOTOX) and treating (fillers) static and dynamic lines.

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