Consuming Button Batteries Is A Big Danger For Your Child

By Expert Contributor Katie Kovaleski

 Image via: wsj.com

Image via: wsj.com

As any parent knows, especially when your children are small, they tend to want to sample everything around them with their mouths. Putting things into their mouths is normal and predictable but unfortunately can cause an immense of amount of harm. Something in particular to pay close attention to is an item that can be found in bulk throughout most households- batteries!

The small button batteries that can be found in “small remotes, car key fobs, mini remotes that control MP3 speakers, calculators, bathroom scales, reading lights, flameless candles, talking books, singing greeting cards, watches, thermometers, hearing aids, flashing jewelry, ornaments, games and toys” can be lethal to your children and can easily be swallowed.

“If you think your child swallowed a battery, get to an emergency room. Time is of the essence. The saliva triggers an electrical current and causes a chemical reaction that can burn the esophagus in as little as two hours”  (today.com, 2015).

The family featured in the today.com, article nearly lost their 1-year-old son when he swallowed a small remote control battery. It has taken years and 65 surgeries to repair the damage. Please take the time to read this entire article and pass it on to other friends and family who have small children. You can read the entire article by clicking this link: today.com.

Please also take a minute to read these safety tips, they could save your child’s life:

  • “Button batteries are found in small remotes, car key fobs, mini remotes that control MP3 speakers, calculators, bathroom scales, reading lights, flameless candles, talking books, singing greeting cards, watches, thermometers, hearing aids, flashing jewelry, ornaments, games and toys.
  • Keep loose batteries out of the reach and sight of children. Use duct tape to secure remote controls and other devices with these batteries
  • Do not allow children to play with batteries.
  • Store new and used batteries like medication, out of the reach of children or in a locked cabinet.
  • Check to see if battery compartments on toys and other household products are secured.
  • Secure (using strong tape) battery compartments of toys and other household products.
  • If battery compartments are loose or broken, keep product out of the reach of children.
  • Try to purchase products with battery compartments that require a tool to open.
  • Never change batteries in front of children.
  • Call Poison Control (1-800-222-1222) and seek immediate medical attention if a battery has been swallowed. A lithium battery begins to burn within two hours.
  • Tell doctors and nurses that it might be a button battery.
  • If possible, provide the identification number found on the battery’s package.
  • Do not let the child eat or drink until a chest X-ray can determine if a battery is present
  • Do not induce vomiting”.